Brewers select three on day one of MLB Draft

SECAUCUS, N.J. — The Milwaukee Brewers selected three players on day one of the MLB Draft Monday night, using their last two picks on high school prospects.

Milwaukee’s first selection came at pick No. 9, drafting second baseman Keston Hiura (UC | Irvine). MLB Pipeline ranked Hiura as their No. 22 prospect, making special note of his below-average arm which will need Tommy John surgery before he plays at the Major League level. But his hitting power is what stands out among many scouts. In 2017, he slashed .442/.567/.693.

The Brewers used their next pick on outfielder Tristen Lutz (Martin High School | Texas), selecting him 34th overall. Again, it’s a power hitting prospect, ranked as the 32nd best player of this draft class by MLB pipeline. His base-running is considered slightly above average, but not good enough to make him a lock in the first round. He’ll likely play right field once he reaches the Majors.

Milwaukee rounded out the day by taking RHP Caden Lemons (Vestavia Hills High School | Alabama) with their 46th pick. Ranked No. 77 by MLB Pipeline, Lemons maxes out his fastball at 97 MPH, but because of his 6-6 frame, he struggles with consistently hitting the strike zone. Milwaukee hopes to take advantage of his four-pitch arsenal if he can gain consistency with control.

The MLB Draft continues Tuesday at 11:30 a.m. CT with Milwaukee selecting ninth in rounds 3-10.

UW linebacker T.J. Watt will enter the 2017 NFL Draft

MADISON, Wis. — “I’m solely focused on this game, 100 percent,” Wisconsin linebacker T.J. Watt said Thursday prior to the Cotton Bowl. “Everything that comes after this game, comes after this game. I’m not worried about the future at all right now.”

Watt didn’t need to wait long after a 24-16 win over Western Michigan to decide he’s ready to make an impact in the National Football League. He announced his decision to leave school early and test the waters in professional football.

The redshirt junior leaves Wisconsin with 15.5 tackles for loss and 11.5 sacks on the season, leading the team in both categories. He added 63 total tackles, an interception, and two forced fumbles to his numbers. His performance led to a first-team All-Big Ten bid, as well as first-team All-American honors by Sports Illustrated second-team by The Associated Press.

“I’m excited about the opportunity of being able to sit down and take into serious consideration my options,” Watt said on Thursday.

Watt is the younger brother of both J.J. (Houston Texans) and Derek (San Diego Chargers) but hopes scouts notice him for his performance, not his last name. He’s considered a second or third round NFL talent by many analysts.

Bucks Select Maker, Brogdon in Draft, Trade 38th Pick McCaw to Warriors

The Milwaukee Bucks have selected South Sudanese born and Australian native power forward Thon Maker with the tenth overall selection in the 2016 NBA Draft this evening.

Maker played in 2015-16 for Athlete Institute in Canada. The 7-foot, 216-pound forward has a 7-foot-3-inch wingspan.

The 19-year-old has faced skepticism questioning his real age after escaping the Sudan at age six. He has played for the Athlete Institute since he was 17.

With their first of two second round picks at #36 overall, the Bucks selected Virginia guard Malcolm Brogdon. In his senior season with Virginia, Brogdon averaged 18.2 points per game, shot just shy of 90% from the foul line, and was 39.2% efficient from three-point range.

Rather than use their 38th overall selection, the Bucks traded the pick, UNLV guard Pat McCaw, to the Golden State Warriors in exchange for $2.4 million in cash.

Virginia guard Malcolm Brogdon (15) shoots a three point shot against Butler during the first half of a second-round men's college basketball game in the NCAA Tournament, Saturday, March 19, 2016, in Raleigh, N.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
Virginia guard Malcolm Brogdon (15) shoots a three point shot against Butler during the first half of a second-round men’s college basketball game in the NCAA Tournament, Saturday, March 19, 2016, in Raleigh, N.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)