The Neighborhood: Bucks can’t backdoor Antetokounmpo

The Milwaukee Bucks signed Giannis Antetokounmpo to a four-year, $100 million contract extension on Tuesday afternoon, locking up a key member of the franchise through the 2020-21 season. Antetokounmpo’s deal puts the Bucks in a great position because the Greek Freak took about $6 million less than a max contract to give Milwaukee room to operate when it comes to future roster moves.

But will Antetokounmpo be rewarded for his generosity or will the Bucks take advantage when it comes to his next deal?

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Antetokounmpo has been one of the most vocal supporters of the city of Milwaukee and didn’t ask for an additional fifth year on the contract due to the potential of a fluctuating salary cap after the 2017 collective bargaining agreement is reached. A fifth year could have bound Milwaukee into a bad financial situation should the salary cap drop below the Bucks’ expectations. The deal also includes to player option for that fourth year, keeping Antetokounmpo in Milwaukee for the full length of the deal.

There are some instances of instability in the Bucks’ organization, however, that should keep Antetokounmpo’s head on a swivel.

Last season, the Bucks went a disappointing 33-49 and missed the postseason even after adding free agent gem Greg Monroe. It took until after the All-Star break for head coach Jason Kidd to move Antetokounmpo to point guard, which provided almost instant success for the 21-year-old phenom. Antetokounmpo finished with an average of 16.9 points, 7.7 rebounds, and 4.3 assists. He also became the youngest Bucks player to record a triple double, logging 27 points, 12 rebounds, and 10 assists in a Feb. 22 win over the Los Angeles Lakers.

There was also the security breach from this past May, in which several Milwaukee Bucks players had their financial information stolen, including social security numbers, addresses, compensation, and more. An email scam compromised their security, which is cause for concern when thinking long term about what that means for Antetokounmpo.

I’m not saying the Bucks have it out for Antetokounmpo or any other player, but let’s hope the young Greece native isn’t naïve to some of the corruption that happens in major and professional sports in the United States. If Milwaukee wants to have future chances at greatness and win a championship for the first time since 1971, they’ll make good on their debt of gratitude to Antetokounmpo and lead him to the top of the NBA mountain.

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